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Program - Day 2

Day 1   Day 2   Day 3   Day 4
Preliminary schedule, subject to change.

Go to:
Day 1 - Sunday, November 8
Day 3 - Tuesday, November 10
Day 4 - Wednesday, November 11


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9 - SCHEDULE

7:00-18:00
CONFERENCE REGISTRATION


7:30-9:00
LEADERS' BREAKFAST AND ROUNDTABLE


9:00-10:15 CONCURRENT SESSIONS SERIES A
A1, BRIDGING WESTERN AND EASTERN EDUCATION TOGETHER: AN EDUCATIONAL PARTNERSHIP BETWEEN ESTAR UNIVERSITY (CHINA) AND LETHBRIDGE COLLEGE (CANADA) (FAC)
An international education is highly desirable for many students, but often they face obstacles studying abroad. Estar University, China, and Lethbridge College, Canada, have established a successful partnership offering a Joint Diploma in International Business Administration to 250 students in China. A core group of faculty from both institutions, collaboratively teach using technology and traditional classroom delivery modes to offer this program in English. The presenters from both countries, representing administration, and faculty, will discuss barriers, technological impediments, and finally, the successes both institutions encountered with curriculum, professional development, cultural orientation, assessment and measurement to ensure student success in a joint educational program.
Presenters: Rick Buis, Maggie Sun, Jay Buis, Alan Andron, Lethbridge College; Chen Changjin, President, Estar University, Qingdao, China.

A2, INVOLVING FACULTY AND STUDENTS IN INTERNATIONAL APPLIED RESEARCH: AN INTEGRATED MODEL FOR SUCCESS IN ADVANCING INTERNATIONALIZATION (IDC)
Working on applied research projects with industry and community partners provides students with the opportunity to enhance the skills and knowledge they have learned in the classroom. This collaborative presentation will focus on effective models for the engagement of students in International Applied Research. Faculty, staff and students from Niagara College will share best practices in methods for student recruitment and training, discuss various ways to involve international partners, and present examples of successful International Applied Research Projects.
Presenters: Jos Nolle, Dawit Eshetu, Natalee Tokar, Samantha Hunter, Kelano Forbes and Kathy Rose, Niagara College.

A3, EMERGING SETTLEMENT ISSUES AND SERVICES FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS (ISS)
Recent immigration policy changes are attracting more international students, many of whom will remain permanently in Canada. This session will outline policy changes aimed at recruiting and retaining international students as immigrants and highlight challenges and changing essential service needs for international students. Promising strategies within post-secondary institutions and community settlement organizations to support international students transitioning to stay permanently will be shared. Time will be allocated in the presentation for participants to share experiences, ideas and approaches to meeting the emerging needs of international students.
Presenters: Sophia J Lowe, World Education Services; Diana Ning, Ryerson University; Josie DiZio, COSTI Immigrant Services.

A4, THE INTERNATIONAL STUDENT SAFETY DEBATE: MOVING BEYOND DENIAL (IE)
A reputation for being able to provide international students with a safe study environment is a valuable competitive asset in the international education market. Despite this being the case, until very recently international student safety has not been explored, indeed it is argued that it has been avoided for fear that discussion might induce concern amongst customers and undermine the growth in student numbers. This situation is now in a process of transition. Focusing on safety from criminal activity, in this paper we contribute to this emergent debate by detailing why student safety has become a topic that is beginning to be highlighted rather than avoided.
Presenters: Chris Nyland and Helen Forbes-Mewett, Monash University, Australia.

A5, MEASURING IMPACT: WHAT CAN WE LEARN FROM PROGRAM EVALUATIONS TO ASSESS STUDY ABROAD OUTCOMES? (ME)
As the field of education abroad moves forward with increasing participation rates and a plethora of education abroad models, the need for data demonstrating the outcomes of these experiences becomes increasingly more important and relevant. Is what we are doing actually serving our constituents? What is their level of satisfaction, growth and knowledge at the end? How does this compare with their expectations before embarking on their education abroad sojourns?
Moderator: Alexandra Hausstein, DAAD Toronto. Presenters: Sebastian Fohrbeck, DAAD New York; Robert Gutierrez, American Institute of International Education (IIE); Myriam Wijlens, Vice President for International Affairs, University of Erfurt, Germany.

A6, THE UNSEEN PART OF THE ICEBERG: STRATEGIES FOR ATTRACTING (AND RETAINING) THE NOT SO BRIGHT AND THE NOT SO GREAT (RMA)
Universities vie for the best and brightest. However, there is a larger pool of potential applicants that can be tapped with well thought out marketing strategies, alternative programs and exceptional service. This session will profile how colleges with the largest number of international students attract and retain students. This session will appeal to all education sectors both public and private.
Presenters: Gordon McNeil, Langara College; John Hill, Seneca College.


10:30-11:45 CONCURRENT SESSIONS SERIES B
B1, CREATING INTERNATIONAL PARTNERSHIPS: RETHINKING ATTITUDES TOWARDS ESTABLISHING SUSTAINABLE RELATIONSHIPS IN HIGHER EDUCATION (FAC)
While there is a growing body of literature around establishing and facilitating transnational partnerships in higher education institutions, much of this work is around economic and quality assurance issues at the institutional level. To date comparatively little investigation has focused on the individual implications for academics who work in transnational partnership contexts. This presentation attempts, through the use of narrative, to explore the establishment of an affective relationship between a faculty of education in a large regional Australian university and a partner institution in the Asian region. The space in which this relationship has been established is the focus. Reflecting upon the perceptual, sociological, ideological, political and ecological dimensions of the space (Gruenewald, 2003), it is clear that the issue of social relationships needs careful scrutiny. The authors postulate that to enhance learning and teaching across contexts, transnational partnership building needs to privilege the human element, as well as the more evidential quality assurance and compliance aspects of such arrangements, for staff as well as for students.
Presenter: Karen Noble, University of Southern Queensland, Australia.

B2, THE SMILING COAST: INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION EXCHANGE IN THE GAMBIA (IDC)
Through first hand accounts of student experiences during a CIDA sponsored trip to the Gambia, this session will address the concept of international learning as an effective educational tool. International learning will be discussed in terms of the opportunities it presents, as well as some of the obstacles encountered in the planning and execution stages of the project. We will also discuss options for gauging the success of international learning and the potential long term impacts of these types of initiatives.
Presenters: Camaro West, Dustin Martin and Mira Lyon, Saint Mary's University.

B3, COMMUNITY SETTLEMENT PROGRAM FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENT FAMILIES: DELIVERY MODEL FOR BEST SERVICES (ISS)
This session will explore the Program to Facilitate Adjustment in New Environment for the International Students' Family Community. This Program is collaboration between Memorial University of Newfoundland and the province of Newfoundland. Family Program's goal is to effectively assist families in starting new roots in a new environment by providing essential information and activities for the families. In this session we will highlight the various services we provided and our accumulated experiences and perspectives. Providing the essentials for newly-arrived families in a new place increases the possibility of retention in Newfoundland and Labrador.
Presenters: Shahana Islam and Natasha Clark, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

B4, INNOVATING LOCALLY TO WIN GLOBALLY: A MODEL FOR PARTNERING SMEs AND THE EDUCATION SECTOR TO INTERNATIONALIZE CANADA'S REGIONAL AND NATIONAL ECONOMIES (IE)
This paper presents a practical model for partnering small and medium enterprises (SMEs) with international business management students. Existing innovation policy is not currently financed and structured to capitalize on the significant untapped export potential of SMEs, and Canadian SMEs are reluctant (due to size) to hire the business talent they need to go global. Students benefit from working on live-client projects, assisting local SMEs to create the business innovations that lead to increased regional and national economic competitiveness. To support this model, governments need to broaden existing innovation policy to embrace the business dimension of new value creation, and open innovation funding to involve students in non-technical disciplines at Canada's colleges and universities.
Presenters: Murray E. Morgan, Fanshawe College and Corporate Partner

B5, CONSULAR SERVICES AND EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT
Over two million Canadians live, work, or study abroad. It is important to be prepared and to expect the unexpected while abroad. By preparing carefully in advance, Canadians can prevent serious and costly problems. Find out how to get help, how to help students and how emergencies are handled by Consular Services.
The seminar's outline will include:
- Prevention: To prepare Canadians for safe trips by providing them with credible, accurate and timely information and tools BEFORE they leave Canada.
- Assistance: To provide a range of services to Canadians experiencing difficulties in foreign countries.
- Emergency Management: To coordinate the Government of Canada's response to international emergencies affecting Canadians abroad.
Session Organizer: Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada

B6, INNOVATIVE RECRUITMENT IN CHINA: BUILDING SUSTAINED RELATIONSHIPS WITH HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS, TEACHERS AND PARENTS THROUGH AN EDUCATION PROGRAM (RMA)
Agents and education expositions represent broad based recruitment strategies where you cast a wide net, but make a comparatively shallow impression. This workshop describes depth-based program development in China. Kings University College has years of experience in forming academic and recruitment partnerships with Chinese institutions. For example, in 2008, KUC (working with GrokChina) established an annual high school business competition in partnership with Chinese high schools. GrokChina has worked with many North American institutions to run deep partnership programs with Chinese institutions. Drawing on specific examples, learn the pros and cons of incorporating depth-based programs into your recruitment strategy.
Presenters: Ken Bowlby, King's University College at the University of Western Ontario, and Kim Morrison, GrokChina, LLC.

12:30-13:45
CONFERENCE WELCOME, NETWORKING LUNCH AND KEYNOTE ADDRESS: Dr. James Orbinski

Having worked all over the world on behalf of Médecins sans frontières/Doctors Without Borders, Dr. James Orbinski accepted the Nobel Peace Prize in his role as the organization's international president in 1999. With degrees in medicine and international relations from McMaster University and the University of Toronto respectively, Dr. Orbinski is committed to research, education and activism and he has represented MSF not only in humanitarian emergencies but, as well, on international bodies such as the UN Security Council, the WHO and the UNHCR. Dr. Orbinski has received many honorary doctorates and awards including Canada's Meritorious Service Cross and, most recently, the 2009 Shaughnessy Cohen prize for An Imperfect Offering: Humanitarian Action in the Twenty-first Century, which chronicles his work in Rwanda and Somalia. He practices clinical medicine at St Michael's Hospital in Toronto and is a Senior Fellow at both Massey College's Centre for International Health and the Munk Centre for International Studies at the University of Toronto.

Dr. Orbinski believes in humanitarianism, in citizenship and in actively engaging and shaping the world we live in so that it is more humane, fair and just.


14:00-16:00
PANEL: INTERNATIONALIZATION EFFECTIVENESS IN A TIME OF ECONOMIC UNCERTAINTY

Chaired by Dr. Vianne Timmons, President and Vice-Chancellor, University of Regina
Participants:
Prof. Gong Ke, President, Tianjin University, PRC
Dr. Sebastian Fohrbeck, Director, German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD), New York
Dr. John Hudzik, President, NAFSA: Association of International Educators
Dr. Yvon Fontaine, President and Vice-Chancellor, Université de Moncton and President, Agence universitaire de la Francophonie (AUF)
Ms Karen McBride, President, CBIE


16:15-17:30 CONCURRENT SESSIONS SERIES C
C1, EDUCATION WITHOUT BOUNDARIES: INTERNATIONAL LEARNING PROGRAMS IN BELIZE, BOSNIA, AND TANZANIA
This session is an interactive, multimedia presentation and discussion on Nova Scotia Community College's "education without boundaries" CIDA public engagement fund project which engages students in international education abroad and at home through innovative media projects documenting fellow students and faculty international learning programs in Belize, Bosnia and Tanzania. The media projects are then used to share the stories and learning through I@H initiatives on campuses. The session reviews the challenges and opportunities involved in this type of project, funding possibilities, success factors future goals for our project, and an opportunity for participants to share their stories and perspectives and strategies on similar projects.
Presenters: Katie Orr, Zoran Kondali, Ashley Pinsent-Tobin and Kellie McMullin, Nova Scotia Community College
*NB: This session has been changed from the original "Portfolio Learning and Faculty Development: Internationalization Lessons from a College Partnership in Canada and China."*

C2, OPTIMIZING INTEGRATION AND DIVERSITY: HE INSTITUTIONS + COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS = BENEFITS FOR ALL (IDC)
There is a beauty in the intercultural mosaic of our local communities in Canada that is ripe to explore and share for the benefit of everyone. This includes the dimension of internationalization efforts within our higher education institutions. We could be opening our doors, sharing our ideas and knowledge around diversity and integration, bringing international students and professors to live in our communities, etc. Some of these actions could result in benefits for everyone involved. Using a case study from the City of North Bay, Ontario, (North Bay Newcomer Network, Multicultural Centre and Nipissing University) participants will explore ideas and identify opportunities in their own backyard and obtain the tools to move forward.
Presenters: Karen Strang, Nipissing University; Ann Welsh, North Bay & District Multicultural Centre; Marla Tremblay, City of North Bay.

C3, CONGRATULATIONS, YOU'VE PASSED THE TOEFL TEST! NOW, WHAT? (ISS)
Internationalization has become an increasingly important part of Canadian universities' strategies and planning. One of the key trends in internationalization is attracting international students to Canadian institutions. International students help to internationalize campuses by contributing to the popular concept of university students as global citizens. Beyond that, they are considered to be a valuable source of immigrants to Canada, having an advanced education and a presumed familiarity with Canada obtained through their studies in the country. This presentation will offer a look at the integration services available to international students at Canadian universities which enhance this familiarity with Canada's culture and the English language. What are they? How effective are they? What are some of the challenges they face and how might they be overcome?
Presenters: Jelena Damjanovic, University of Toronto and Rachel Crowe, University of Western Ontario.

C4, WHERE ARE THEY NOW? (IE)
As Study Abroad Advisors we are very involved in our students' lives for a brief two or three year period. We connect with them before, during and immediately after their study abroad experience, but rarely once they have graduated. However, that is when they have a wealth of knowledge and information that is invaluable to our jobs. This session will bring together past study abroad participants to hear their comments on how their study abroad experience impacted their current career, and their comments on how we should support students. They can offer valuable feedback on Internationalization Effectiveness: Measures for Success.
Presenters: Beth Alaksa, York University; Miranda Cheng, University of Toronto; Lorna Unger, Carleton University.

C5, EVALUATING STUDENT EXCHANGE PROGRAMS: A MODEL FOR PROMOTING INSTITUTIONAL QUALITY PROCESSES (ME)
The ongoing evaluation of an institution's exchange programs is critical to sustaining quality education and positive student experience. But how can we measure program quality and outcomes in a meaningful way to make informed decisions when establishing student exchange agreements? In this session, participants will be introduced to an evaluation model that is based on a set of criteria developed in the context of the institution's policies and objectives. The session will address the review process, outcomes, challenges, and recommendations.
Presenter: Suhair Deeb, Ryerson University.

C6, UNIVERSITY TRANSFER PROGRAMS: THE WHOLE PACKAGE. ACADEMIC INTEGRITY, INSTITUTIONAL RELATIONSHIPS, INTERNATIONAL STUDENT RECRUITMENT AND STUDENT EXPERIENCE (RMA)
This session will discuss the structure and benefits of university transfer programs for international students at the various institutional levels, including academic quality and integrity, transferability, the provision of access to a university education, the benefits to both college and university and student outcomes.
Presenters: Victoria Heron, Navitas, Fraser International College and Susan Deane, International College of Manitoba.

C7, EDU-CANADA
Session Organizer: Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada (details to follow)

17:00-18:30
BOARD MEETING



19:00-21:00
Optional Dinner - 360 The Restaurant at the CN Tower ($75)


Session Streams
1. Faculty Engagement (FAC)
2. International Development and Cooperation (IDC)
3. International Student Services (ISS)
4. Internationalization Effectiveness: Strategies for success (IE)
5. Mobility and Exchanges (ME)
6. Recruitment, Marketing and Admissions (RMA)
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